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The benefits of intensive language courses

Why intensive language programs are better for learning Dutch


People tend to focus on the “intensive” part of “intensive language learning,” but the latter is why we’re here: to learn a language. If your goal is simply to improve your language skills, this is the way to go, period. It may require more class and homework time, but the payoff will be your newly gained knowledge of the Dutch language.


Here's an explanation of exactly why intensive language learning is so effective.



1. Shorter intervals between classes

The first big advantage to intensive learning is pure chronological frequency; in other words, you’re learning the language more often. You know that feeling when you know you have the perfect situation to use the new verb you learned in class, but you just can’t recall it? That doesn’t happen in intensive language learning. With a shortened cycle between classes, each day gives you one, digestible chunk of new information to play with. It is much easier to practice (and therefore internalize) five new verbs with class time each day to ask questions, than twenty new ones and have your questions put on hold until next week.


2. You're exposed to more material

By a similar token, having class time each day with your teacher gives you an abundance of new vocabulary and grammar to learn. This means that while each morsel you learn is divided into a more digestible size, you actually end up covering much more material over the range of the course.

Not only will your vocabulary be bigger, but you’ll have a chance to really master those complex grammatical structures that distinguish a native-sounding speaker from a beginner. Locals will be impressed with your improved Dutch language skills, and that positive enforcement will make you want to keep learning.



3. Fuller immersion

A more intensive language study gives you fewer chances to slip back into the safety net of English. You gain the most in your language skills when you have to use it. The inability to converse in English forces your mind to dig around in the local language and figure out new paths to convey what you need to say. It familiarizes you with the structures and patterns of the language, its tendencies and verbal street signs, and makes you better prepared for your next encounter.

You know that feeling when you know you have the perfect situation to use the new verb you learned in class, but you just can't recall it? That doesn't happen in intensive language learning.

4. You'll save some money

By packing more learning into an equal-or-smaller time frame, you are able to get in, get your knowledge on, and get out. At Dutch of Course you can buy private tutoring lessons à la carte, so you can choose the amount of hours you’d like to have each week.

Having class time each day with your teacher gives you an abundance of new vocabulary and grammar to learn. Not only will your vocabulary be bigger, but you’ll have a chance to really master those complex grammatical structures that distinguish a native-sounding speaker from a newcomer.


Do you speak in dollar signs and euros? Then you better learn to speak in a couple languages, because if you ever want to attain a job at the highest rank of a big multinational corporation, it’s better if you are able to speak the local language to your regional supervisors and managers. There are already financial institutions demanding poly-fluency of all applicants.


The prize of polyfluency is one that has been coveted and admired for thousands of years, and it is appreciated by none more than the speaker. Speaking multiple languages will open up doors not just to the corner office on the top floor, but to your human heart as well.